#AnatomyOfLeadership(4): What Leadership Effectiveness Means

Anatomy4As a younger leader, I read many leadership books. They had ideals, standards and clearly stated the qualities that a leader should possess. To be effective, I had to practice a long list. It wore me out – and I found out why.

Those books addressed only the good and left me clueless on what to do with the bad and the crazy. I got relief when I realized that my weaknesses and complexities are vital aspects of my effectiveness.

On that note, I redefined leadership effectiveness. It’s simply the sum total of The Good, The Bad and The Crazy. The formula would look like this:

The Good + The Bad + The Crazy = Leadership Effectiveness

How does this work?

Focus on the three aspects. None is more important than the other. As much as the good, I suggest that you KNOW, OWN and MANAGE your weaknesses and crazies. Pay attention and think through a management system to handle them.

Your faults and crazies may never change, but you can be in charge. And yes, you can be crazy and lead well.

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The Anatomy of Leadership ~ 3

Anatomy3I began this series by stating that every leader is made up of three major parts: The Good, The Bad, The Crazy. I’ve addressed the first two. Now, welcome to The Crazy.

The crazy is the complicated aspects of the leader’s life. It’s those elements that have deep, complex roots that can’t be easily explained or taken at face value – the crazy defies logic.

Usually, these are inward struggles due to different life experiences or the leader’s background. For most leaders, this is the toughest part of their existence. It’s simply complicated.

Leaders avoid talking about these areas of their lives because they grapple with its complexities – sometimes for many years – and lack the articulation required to share it with the public. It’s private and typically not shared.

However, it comes out in symptoms and often shocking behavioral patterns that make people wonder. It’s one reason why a massively successful person would suddenly commit suicide for “no apparent reason” – with no explanation. The crazy does exist and it’s part of leadership.

If that’s the case, what does leadership effectiveness mean in the context of this anatomy? Part four explains it.

The Anatomy of Leadership ~ 2

Anatomy2The bad is the leader’s weaknesses. These are faults or undeveloped areas in the leader’s life. Weaknesses in leaders vary – from emotional or character flaws to professional incompetence.

For instance, Tiger Woods is a great golfer, but had issues in his personal life. Every leader is flawed in some way.

Many leaders fail because they try to build integrity on their weaknesses. They make promises in these areas oblivious of the depth of their flaws. Here good intentions don’t count. It’s difficult to build integrity in an area in which you’ve not developed.

That said. Does a leader’s weakness make them a bad leader? No. Yes. No because faults are challenges that can be managed or overcome. Yes – when the leader lets their flaws run amok. But overall, weaknesses don’t have to disqualify a leader. It’s the leader’s choice.

Managed or not, weaknesses in the leader may or may not go away. But it’s a vital aspect in trying to understand leadership because the bad comes with the package and affects everyone involved with the leader.

In the next part, I’ll address: The Crazy. Keep reading.

The Anatomy of Leadership

Anatomy1Leadership is a big word; it feels strangely weighty – probably why it’s easily misunderstood. However, it’s essential to life. The leadership guru, John C. Maxwell, said that, “everything rises and falls on leadership” – and in this case, everything means everything.

After years of studying leaders, I’ve demystified and articulated the anatomy of leadership and this is it: every leader is made up of three major parts – The Good, The Bad, The Crazy. I’ll breakdown each part in this series.

The Good is the leader’s strengths. This aspect of the leader’s essence adds value to others – folks enjoy this part. Here delivery is effortless because the leader is gifted or has developed in an area. Leaders display their strengths with pride. Also, it’s a tool for integrity.

For instance: Sir Richard Branson is great at entrepreneurship or the U.S. President, Barack Obama, is an amazing orator. These are areas of strength.

Many leadership books encourage people to focus only on their strengths. Sounds like good advice, but I don’t agree. That’s just one part. How about the bad and the crazy?

What the Global Entrepreneurship Summit Means for Africa

Creative-Growth-800x542The financial analyst, Aly Khan Satchu, said that, “Kenya, and Nairobi in particular, is globally fluent, has 21st century connectivity and an impressive pool of human capital.” He’s right.

Previously, those words would describe a western city – but not anymore. He’s talking about Nairobi – a vibrant city in Africa – and that’s the new Africa. Nations like Kenya are a sample of the emerging trend on the continent.

Johnnie Carson and Mark Bellany, both former United States ambassadors to Kenya confirm that, “Kenya’s fast growing economy is based on a dynamic private sector, a diversified services sector and high education levels.”

What does this mean?

It means that after years of poverty, corruption, trial-and-error, African nations are finally finding blueprints that actually work and the results are evident.

Furthermore, just like the wild-fire of independence in the 1960s, this fire is going to spread. Nation after nation will eventually find what works despite their peculiar challenges.

The Global Entrepreneurial Summit is simply an official announcement to the world that Africa is ready to trade in ideas. The 21st century will experience an Africa that’s poised to do global business at any level.

GES: Global Entrepreneurship Summit in Nairobi, Kenya

GESNairobi is my city – and this week, the feverish excitement is palpable. Walking through the city center, you would see the distinct change in the atmosphere, unlike other days. Traffic is insane, even the media is going wild. It’s crazy!

Why? Two things!

First, the U.S. President, Barack Obama, is coming home. Here, it’s a big deal. So yes, the U.S. Security Services are taking no chances. They are everywhere. This week, I suspect that Nairobi will be the most secure spot on the planet.

Second, the Global Entrepreneurship Summit (GES) is taking place in the East African hub. From the 24th-26th, innovators, entrepreneurs, investors and business leaders will be playing in my city. The excitement is fun. I’m enjoying it.

However, when the dust settles and the hype ends and President Obama goes home with his crew – what does it all mean?

I’ll enjoy the party, by all means. But after the party, I’ll roll up my sleeves and get to work because history has proven that hype alone is unsustainable. When the rubber meets the road, only those who are truly prepared enjoy the goods. For now, let’s have fun!

The Power of NO

ftch_newmuseum2808In my teens, my mum would tell me that: “too much of anything is bad – even the good stuff.” Then, I didn’t believe her; I wanted everything and didn’t care about measure.

Now, her advice comes to mind when I think about the flow of information in the 21st century. These days, we have so much information coming at us daily – so that what’s actually a good thing sometimes feels like a siege. Every day, we grapple on various devices and media, trying to keep up. It’s tough!

Suddenly, we barely have much time because each message or piece of information demands our response. Consequently, our attention is constantly pulled in many different directions.

In order to be an effective human being (not entrepreneur, leader, etc – just a sane person), you’ve got to engage the amazing time management tool of: NO. Every successful person that I know uses this tool masterfully – and joyfully.

It’s an old trick, but it works. I can’t be at every meeting, party, conference or social event; I’m not cut out for every opportunity. Hence, NO is my favorite work tool; I love it!